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regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the arabian peninsula. there are finally important decisions to be made. on the one hand, the united states must rebalance its global policy to deal with issues like russia, to deal with china and so on. at the same time the united states can't simply withdraw, it doesn't have the ability to simply exit and doesn't have an endgame in any of these areas. so we have a very powerful nation, much less possible it might be another circumstances because it's so off-balance. >> host: that's where i was really surprised in a way to look at where you're taking the consequences in that analysis. let's take those three that
to go to the religious authority to get sanction. in india, you are ton sand if -- sanity if id by a brahman. that's what we mean by rule of law. the only world civilization that did not have rule of law is china. the reason, they never had a central religion. it's amazing to think they got primitive because of a religion. you only have to worship your ancestors. there's really no authority that comes from that. it was completely controlled by the state. no chinese emperor has ever felt there's a higher source of law to obey. that continues to the present day. the chinese party does a constitution. they make the constitution. the constitution doesn't limit what they want to do. in the west, rule of law develops very early and very powerfully. one the heros in my book, the classic all like the reformation. i like the catholic church in a couple of important historical respects. in terms of the rule of law, the church was extremely important. in the post period, in the early middle ages, bishops and priest could marry and vice president children. they all ought to turn the benefit
about drone strikes, u.s. relations with india and the presence of osama bin laden in his country before his killing last spring. the former pakistani president plans to return to pakistan next year to seek the presidency in 2013. he recently spoke at the woodrow wilson center for about an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning and welcome to the wilson center. and for many of you, including president musharraf, welcome back to the wilson center. i understand we have overflow crowds in numerous rooms befitting an important visitor and an important speech. my name is jane harman, i am the relatively new -- three months into it -- president and ceo of the wilson center. i'm a recovering politician. [laughter] having spent nine months -- nine months, nine terms in the united states congress, some would say and i would agree that my timing in terms of leaving was impeccable. [laughter] this is the second time that the center has hosted a public address by the former president of pakistan, pervez musharraf, a fact that underscores the center's intense interest in pakistan and its com
with these things. this is just the fact of life. india will be in the same position, though my estimate, india's at high-growth rate somewhere around 13 years, you know, behind china in the course of this. i will play one thing that josh feldman and i were talking about the totally new thought that comes posted the book. that i have start to think about it is based upon, on the basis of conversations in asia recently. so let me say it in two ways. first of all it's pretty clear those of you who know industrial organization, you know that we measure concentration and industry it's a kind of way of thinking about how our galapagos take it will be. to share the top two, the share of the top four, the index and a bunch of others. and we know i think it's obvious the global economy is be concentrated because of the smaller entities are growing quickly. why didn't realize until recently his that pattern will reverse in about two years. because of the size of high-growth part of the global economy. i maybe wrong on on the timing but we are going on a 15 year time horizon be in a position in which the
know, newspapers sometimes describe pakistanis as quote-unquote paranoid and india-centric. no. we have a region where we will live long after the americans' security concern du jour has passed. we know that from fact. we know it from the cold war. we were the country that provided the intelligence base from which france's gary powers took off for his mission over the soviet union and got shot down. only to have the soviet union threaten us with retaliation because he took off from a base in pakistan without there being any american commitment actually to be there to protect us against that retaliation if that occurred. those are pieces of history. americans are a great nation, and i've said this. you know that this is my little cliche, but i'm going to repeat it anyway because sometimes cliches are good. and that is that americans do a lot of things very well. america is a great nation which has contributed immensely to human progress, the idea of liberty, freedom, the idea of democracy, modern capitalism, globalization, everything. and then, of course, more than any other nation in th
and later on married a bad when women from india to pakistan and then came back to america. marion -- her parents refused to let her take this back home because it was she would just go to the library after school every day a dozen times. and i littermate mohammed sidon who teaches in new york city and says he gets so many letters from people looking to him for guidance because they read his father spoke. the egyptian singer she would later record with all the windows of her parents apartment open so she could watch people in the suburban lawn below. so she had this kind of uncanny fascination and obsession with arab culture, you know, middle eastern culture. >> so, deborah paints a picture of this child who is swimming against the tide, a life with ideas and business that to the place and time she finds herself to such a painful degree that she herself described a friend mice, isolated environments and her parents home. she's thrown out at two colleges. we're not quite sure why. she is stuck and unhappy. and through the letters andrew tepper's writing, we readers become anxious to know w
as both paranoid unplug and india centric. no we have a region where we will live long after the americans security concern du jour has passed. we know that from fact. we know it from the cold war. we were the country that provided the intelligence base from which france took off for its mission over the soviet union and got shot down. only to have the soviet union threaten us with retaliation because we have a base in pakistan. without there being any american commitment actually to be there to protect us against that retaliation if that occurred. those are pieces of history. so many times those of you have had me. >> know this is my little clicÉe but i'm going to repeat it anyway because sometimes clichÉs are good and that is americans do a lot of things very well. america is a great nation which has contributed immensely to human progress, the idea of liberty and the idea freedom and the idea of democracy modern capitalism and globalization and everything and then of course more than any other nation in at least a 200 years. there is one thing americans don't do. two things americans
empires in india and stuff like that. and so there was this social impact. and at the time, i think what we saw was a very, very deep impact on our society by these darwinian ideas. everything from national socialist and throughout argued the neoclassic economics have thumb imprint of darwinian thinking, particularly as mediated through the likes of herbert. so as i was beginning to look at the process that created us, and we read dolphins chain can we read darwin and perhaps we were selfish shortsighted, ruthless entities forged by an amoral and utterly cruel process. this give me hope it may not necessarily be the idea. i at the age of 90. at the age of 80, he was still writing in the fact i would argue his most important work was published in 1904 and his eighth decade and that's the title page they arecoming to study the results of scientific research in relation to the unity or plurality of worlds. very, very strange title and deed. but what this book really is is a summary of wallace's understand a note what the evolutionary mechanism had created. he wasn't like darwin. he wasn't i
live with him and his family in pakistan, and this man is like what gandhi was to india, this man was to pakistan. that's another question at the heart of the book. why did this incredibly powerful leader invite a jewish girl he had been corresponding with for a year to live with him as his daughter? he already had nine children, but, you know, he was inviting another woman to his house in pack stapp. you know, it's one thing to go back and forth as to who she is, but you need the historical context. where was pakistan at that time? in some ways this beak is also a book about america and pakistan, america and islam, so, you know, i don't want to sort of lose sight of those aspects of the book in, you know, in the fine grain because she is a vehicle for a lot of these sort of meditations, but as to the question of what i decided to do with her letters. i felt it was important for -- to have her as a vehicle for the reader to experience her letters, you know, with immediacy in her own words rather than me paraphrasing them or, you know, saying, you know, well, she says that she grad
trip you might recall to pakistan and india and she was a huge hit. she loved this horse and many photographs you see of her from that time and her time in the white house and on her farm that she ranted and built a farm house right at the end of the presidency in northern virginia so often times when you see her writing she is writing this horse that the pakistani president gave to her. she had thrown for him an amazing state dinner in the springtime and early summer of 1961 at mt. vernon. in fact she had everyone meet and catch a boat to go down the potomac river take an evening cruise and arrive at mount vernon and had beautiful marquees set up at mount vernon and had a beautiful outdoor lovely dinner with music for the president of pakistan and all those invited to state dinners. it still sets the upper bar for amazing state dinners that jacqueline kennedy had. this political symbolism i want to say something about. it taps into emotional and moral and psychological feeling. if jacqueline kennedy is still in our consciousness that is why. she taps into those elements of our em
of the calgary the british brought all the way from india, the famous lancers from germany -- maybe i could get a glass or a bottle of water? when the germans invaded france 1914, then they did so with eight calvary divisions prepare you could just imagine how little chance and then with the age of modern weaponry. everybody practiced for the great cavalry charges and they anticipated what is white knights in armor with a jousting competition. the idea of war was very close to the day's close aligned to images of sport like this. the first correspondent of the london daily mail was the sport center. of course, when they tried to do the mass of charges they come up against barbwire not to mention the machine good. -- machine again. and as a result of those two weapons of the british writer and a machine gun, the western front where most of the bloodshed took place was essentially frozen in place along that line with more than three years. and barely more than a few miles in each direction. in the entire year 1915 where the allies launched -- launched massive assaults probably altogether 1 millio
indigenous people that are being eve this r-rated all over the world. india has been axles which are being hunted down, you have native indians in brazil. even in afghanistan they call the areas where they're doing all the bombing the tribal areas. i want you to speak to the fact that indigenous people around the world are being if under attack. er attack. and is there some way we can get this out into the press so they can understand that this should be stopped immediately? >> guest: well, what you're saying was true. >> guest: what you are saying is true. i was just in norway and the performance with a nsga woman in india under attack by the burmese. i think what it is, there's always the land hunger and indigenous people are vulnerable. there are resources that others want. for instance, in i think it is coaster rica, covered the land and animals and oil. so what we think about is the oil in the gulf. we don't realize that is happening in other regions as well. it should be published. it should be in papers. it is very difficult to have that information. one book that i read was by hawk
. that had a big impact, a particular group in india. this hours of silence. as seen this. it is a very environmentally friendly way of exposing the body. the vultures contaminated. the dead person is recycled into a live in being within a few days. with the demise of the vultures the bodies were being recycled. very influential in the -- people in india. the government banned the use, but it had almost no impact. that would feed it to the cal. it took a much deeper engagement to get this out of cattle. what happened is a number of indian ngos now offering alternative subsidies for alternative drugs to indian farmers in an attempt to win the off wall this as a veterinary medicine. slowly the vultures are returning, but it will take many, many decades for that to happen. again, just in the subcontinent been you have a systemic shift in the waning people deal with a particular dangerous chemical even though there are very poor him. obviously in that country what it. a way that is leading to the recovery of a species that is vital to survival. i should say, it wasn't just some the passing
on quote, a paranoid and india centric. we have a region with long-lost americans security concern. we know that from fact. we know it from the cold war. we were the country that provided the intelligence base for the mission of a soviet union and got shot down only to have the soviet union take enough with the retaliation without there being any american commitment actually to be there to protect us against that retaliation. americans are a great nation and i said this so many times you know that this is my little clich but i'm going to repeat it any way because sometimes cliches are good and that is americans to a lot of things very well. america is a great nation contributed immensely to human progress, the idea of liberty, the idea of freedom and of democracy, modern capitalism, globalization, everything and then of course more than any other nation in at least the last 200 years of that is great but there's one thing americans don't do in fact to the things americans don't deutsch, one is history. the american attitude to history is -- [inaudible] [laughter] [applause] riss henry f
and the united states will agree at some point to reduce agricultural subsidies enough to satisfy china and india to the doha round? >> i think the challenge with doha is not so much america's willingness to consider reductions to support structure and system. i think it's fairly obvious in her physical condition and circumstances that's likely to happen. the problem is there's not a corresponding willingness on the part of china and india to be definite and concrete about how open their markets would be. as we look at a doha round in any trade agreement, we want to make sure it's fair and balanced. we can quantify with great specificity what we're willing to do relative to our support structures and systems. we need the same kind of specificity from china, india, brazil and other countries in terms of how open markets will be to ensure we are getting a fair deal. >> one of the paradoxes of booming u.s. exports is that some of the most feared import dependent nations are the ones that have the greatest amount of food security and the most dependent on food prices seminar price spikes in more deve
the armies had them. indian calvary that the british brought all the way from india to the western front. the famous luan lancers from germany. maybe i could get a glass of water or a bottle of water or something, if there is one. when the germans invaded france in 1914, the they did so with eight calvary divisions, 40,004 -- horses and you can just imagine how little chance a massive calvary charge had with, you know in the age of modern weaponry. nonetheless everybody practice for the great calvary charges like this british soldier who was drilling here. they anticipated a war that would almost be like knights in armor, like adjusting competition. the idea ideal for -- thanks. the idea of war was very closely allied to images of sport like this. in fact, the first correspondent of the london daily mail sent to the front in 1914 was it sports editor. and of course when they try to do these masses calvary charges they come up against barbed wire, not to mention the machine gun. and of course these ended the days of masses -- massive calvary charges forever. as a result of those two weapo
-educated employees their competitors in china and india and singapore and other countries can. and believe me they are producing more college graduates. this is a bleak future but it does not have to be hopeless. there's a tendency even within our community to throw up our hands at the challenge to regard large numbers of low-income children of color as the on hope. i am here to say not only that there is hope but there are solutions. take the challenge of helping low income children of color go to college and stay through graduation. for more than a decade unc and a bill and melinda gates foundation have partnered on the scholars program. each year this program awards good through graduation scholarships to 1,000 low-income students of color. african-americans and hispanics and american indians and after more than a decade after granting 14,000 of these scholarships gates scholars have a five your graduation rate of 88%, double the number of non students of color. a six your graduation rate of 90%. much higher than the overall national graduation rate and comparable to the graduation rate of
live in a time where china and brazil and india the galloping economies are the biggest markets in the world. but i like to start off to tell the audiences that today, in the 800 million people of the indicted states and european union produced almost two-thirds of the world's economic output. $14 trillion of sales are generated by these two economies. they employ 4 million people just as europeans do. european investment contributes 10% of new york gdp. when the yorker out of 20 has of job because of the investment from the european union. that leaves the ultimate prize because these two regions are two of the few in the world that really understand what the position of the individual is in society and in government. three down. all of the things that we take for granted are ingrained in the dna. i would submit to you that keeping the relationship strong is extremely important. that is where but i started to think about nato where it is coming from our headed i thought this is not working because it is that relationship that is starting to suffer. as you know, dado was set up
educated employees, their competitors in china and in india and in singapore and other countries can. and believe me, they are producing more college graduates. this is a bleak future. but it does not have to be hopeless. there is a tendency even within our computer to throw up our hands at the college to regard large number of low-income children of color as beyond hope. i'm here to say not only that there is hope, but there are solutions. take the challenge of helping low-income children of color go to college and stay through graduation. for more than a decade now, uncf and the bill and melinda gates foundation have partnered on the gates millennium scholars. this program awards to 1,000 low-income students of color, african-american,, hispanics, ad after more than a decade of growning 14,000 of these. gates scholar has a five year graduation rate of 88%. double the number of nonstudents of color. and a six year graduation rate of over 90%. much higher than the overall national graduation rate and comparable to the graduation rate from the students of highest income families. what
. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a number of years. you have a rogue officer taking over nuclear installation, or you can have my scenario where a bomb in transit from its secure facility the front lines in a nuclear, storm because that's where it's most one of the. you're the combination of weapons, a country which is hostile, a security service which has ties to jihadists. jihadists have been indulged on the establishment military and security, and you have something that is really a worth a nuclear terrorism i nuclear terrorism i would suggest one the gr
government law to india if single one of the concept they wanted to deemphasized turned out to be vitally important and remanded important to this day how lawyers protect law and the supreme court applies it. so, as a prediction of what lawyers would need to know and i can add parenthetically every time you hear someone predicting one area of law will bloom in the future so we should train more and a mother would shrink ignore them because they are approximately always wrong back in the 70's they felt the energy law was going to bloom and it didn't and no one predicted the trademark licensing law was going to boom which it did and they predicted the services would bloom which they didn't and a divorce would shrink which it didn't i always ignore them, but it wasn't just of course a matter of prediction. oslo and mcdougal were being illogical about it and even as i will mention in a moment no one really adopted the program whole. they had a couple of influential atmospheric influences. one of them was that it got professors used to the idea that their students who were going to be out ther
in china, you know, why so many more boys than girls in china and india and other places and we say, huh, that's funny, what's going to happen there but then we move on to another question. wa-marjah didn't move on. she said what does this mean there's so many missing girls. what's going to happen when these boys grow up and there's no one for them to marry? how will they create families? what will society be like and she has asked those questions both about the society and what's going to happen because of that, but she also went back and researched how did this happen? and some of it what we think we know about things like one-child policy but some of it has to do with zero population growth and an enthusiasm for population control that has had great unintended consequences and i think we'll surprise people. >> and that book is unnatural selection. right next to that, two books about some troubled nations. >> yes. dancing in the glory of monster about the congo by jason stearns -- our editorial director got this book in from actually a friend of jason's, the wonderful journalist mckale
is still enormously, enormously important. we live in a time where china and brazil and india and so on, the galloping economies are going to be the biggest markets in the world. but i always liked to start off by telling the audiences that today, today the 800 million people of the united states and the european union produced almost two-thirds of the world's economic output. $14 trillion in sales are generated by these two economies they employ 4 million people, just as many americans work for european firms as europeans do for american firms. european investment contributes 10% of new york's gdp. one new yorker out of 20 has a job or her job because of the investment from the european union. so that, to me, is the ultimate prize, the ultimate prize also because these two regions are two of the very few in the world there really understand what the position of an individual is in society and in government. freedom, all of those other things that we take for granted are ingrained in the dna on both sides. and so i would submit to you been keeping their relationship strong is extremely
of conquest and discovery and describing india as a racist people that have inferior care to her, inferior religion and that the europeans were a superior civilization, basically notions that is that court in the 1820s saw blacks as also racially inferior indians in the same way. and while that racial attitude towards the blacks has been reversed now and rooted out of the lock, the same notion about indians remained in that it. there's a whole bunch of cases in that same line of judicial time that justified the absolute power of congress, you know, over indian tribes, persons and properties, the sanction of breaking the treaties unilaterally with impunity with the rulers in the entrance as if by unfettered guardianship, you know, without any judicial review, stamping out our religions are notions that really have no place in a moderate society that has much higher values. so we've come a long way under the law in federal indian law. we've had an incredible social movement, but this idea of the supreme court. back on those rights is very troubling. i think we not only have to hawk at 10, th
, city. many companies toured as far away as india, australia, china and as you remember from "the king and i," siam. the play was seen by more people than read the book, although the book it remained extremely popular. and in 1905 "the new york times" said the two most popular books in america are the bible and "uncle tom's cabin." and it kept up a very, very steady presence. the play was seen regularly until about the 1950s and then sporadically after that. there was recently a wonderful staging by alex roe last fall at the metropolitan playhouse in the village. now, in many of those earlier plays uncle tom was falsely presented as a stooped, obedient, old fool. and that's partly where the uncle tom stereotype came from. eva's death in those plays was frequently a syrupy scene in which the actress was hauled heavenward by rope or piano wire against the backdrop of angels and billowing clouds. one might think that such spectacle would defang stowe's revolutionary themes and turn "uncle tom's cabin" into a laughable piece of harmless entertainment, but actually this didn't happen. after
from developing countries which are america's friends such as india, bangladesh, the philippines and indonesia. the outcry in those countries would be loud and politically damaging. so long as the u.s.-led international community is unwilling to either intervene or engage on land in somalia, then the payment of ransom will remain the only way that hostages can be brought home. my final point that is if yemen was to fail, maritime disaccord in this region would worsen considerably. if both side of the gulf of aden were to become launch for potentially terrorist attacks, it is possible that ship operators would demand a much higher level of naval protection. if that was not forthcoming, they may seek alternative routes which would add to the cost of boast finished goods -- both finished goods and raw material including oil and gas. economic development will crowd out islamist extremism as effectively as it will undermine piracy. once again, mr. chairman, thank you for the opportunity to be here today. i'm happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you very much for your
as india, australia, china, and as a member from the king and all i. the play was seen by more people than had read the book with the book itself remained extremely popular and in 1905, "the new york times" said the most popular books in america are the bible and uncle tom's cabin, and kept up a steady presence. the play was seen regularly until the 1950's and sporadically after that there was recently a wonderful staging by alex morrow last fall at the metropolitan house in the village to read in many of the earlier plays uncle tom was presented as a stoop to a obedient old fool and that's partly where the uncle tom stereotype came from. eva's death in those plays was a scene in which the actress was hauled heavenward by rope or piano wire against a backdrop of angels in the clouds. one might think such battles and spectacle what defang uncle tom's revolutionary themes and turn uncle tom into a laughable piece of harmless entertainment but actually this didn't happen. after all, the play is about race relations and wickedness of slavery so fema reindell gup many southerners before the war
population we know how to do it. we have a foreign aid budget on women. .. >> india, china, brazil and south africa. and they signed on to a thing called the copenhagen accord along with many other countries, including the united states. and under the accord those countries all pledged a certain emissions reduction target to be achieved by 2020. if you total up the pledges for emissions reductions under the accord, they get us about two-thirds of the way to where we need to be to avoid dangerous climate change. so we only need another third, right? you might say, well, they're just pledges. is anyone actually with doing mig? well, in fact, they are rather surprisingly. even the united states is doing things. your target here in this country is a 17% reduction by 2020. you're already at -9% as a result of a lot of initiatives that are not happening necessarily at the federal level, but at the state level as well. in a few months' time, we'll see the opening of the first large emissions trading scheme here in this country in california, adopts their ets. there are a number of government initia
in india, burma and china, she immediately volunteered. she didn't care where she went as long as she got to go. there was a man shortage and the newly formed oss was woefully understaffed. it's important i think to remember that when you think of the oss, you generally think about the paramilitary and guerrilla operations. they get all the glory. you think of grainy images of agents parachuting behind enemy lines, but the fact of the matter is of the 13,000 employees, about 4500 of which were women, the vast majority spent their time writing reports, collecting and analyzing information, and planning missions. so the fact that many of the oss is very unorthodox activities could be conducted from behind a desk meant that women could be equally as effective. and so while the majority of women did remain in washington, helping to support the oss's far-flung missions, a very small percentage went overseas. and an even tiny percentage ever went into active operations. but the small percentage that did go overseas, like jane, like julie and betty, they carried out their assignments with the sa
before he died because he had gone to india and believed people shouldn't own property. the radical king was a true radical and believed not in possessing personal property, but, look, he borrowed money from his daddy for taxes and harry bell phenomenonity had taken out a $100,000 policy on each of his five kids. so if malcolm had had a benefactor, if he had been langston hughes, so to speak, and could get some of that white harlem dough, he would have a different perspective. even as we deconstruct capital, the point of karl mark deconconstruction -- deconstruction of the capital. when he said, dude, can you take care of my daughter and i believe in ira, individual reparation account. i believe in ira, individual reparations accounts. you can't give it to great, great, great grandpa but you can redistribute wealth towards some of the contemporary people who are inheriting their ideas but it makes it more incumbent upon us to press the argument forward and to tell the truth about the suffering of the masses who don't even have the quandaries we have because they don't even have a wage. t
for the shareholders of the east india tea company. there's the government being oppressive, the parliament, and i think it's important to understand what the revolution was about for many ordinary patriots was this effort to set up governments of their own, that their problem was that their governments lacked the power to protect the people and promote their prosperity, and that to understand the movement soully as antigovernment is to understand it really halfway and partly from the point of view of thee most well to do who are always the ones who can do without less government, and not from the point of view of the many people who made the revolution happen. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, barbara clark smith. next is john ragosta. >> thank you all for coming. i got started on this project several years back when i was living in coal pepper county, several hours north of here, and i became interested in the coal pepper minutemen, some of barbara's ordinary people, the classic farmers you read about in high school, shoulder the guns, marched 200 miles and win the first significant battle in
in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i would suggest it was the great national security fears that we have. >> in your book you have osama bin lade
are closing in the eradication of older. and he pointed out there are four countries, nigeria, india, pakistan and afghanistan, and the last year for which there is data, of course 2010. and he says it has decreased in nigeria, india and afghanistan, and afghanistan it. they have -- [inaudible] but it increased from 60 some the 144 from 2005-2010. he didn't give reasons our hypotheses why this might be so. let it seems to indicate that there are parts of the country that just are too restless or not under the control of the vaccinations. do you have some insight on that? >> those are absolute numbers. 167, again, besides the population has to be borne in mind. of the four countries you mention, the fastest population growth has been pakistan. and so, therefore, we have more infants that require the polio vaccination. we have a national program for polio eradication. when prime minister took over in 1993, for the second term, it was one of our first priorities and we got it down instantly. right now in the last or years or so, the numbers have spiked a little bit. and they have primarily been i
%. this inequality thrives. the nation does not reflect the population. india and china may be quickly developing, but how many millions of people live in poverty rob big business profits. in the united states tax cuts were given to the richest 2 percent of the country at a time when the government needed nothing more than tax revenue in order to support programs that benefit the economically disadvantaged. class division is an important topic of the economic problems. companies like for the cheapest labor that they can get wherever they can get it. april poor working conditions, long hours, and limited or no benefit. look at american companies. yin's in most industries if there is a union at all of losing power, securing effort -- your improvements to workers' conditions and pay. in some companies illegal immigrants make up much of the workforce, ensuring even less bargaining power for those employees. the biggest tactic used by american and other internationally based companies today is to shift production overseas to less developed and less regulated countries with the bigger workforce such as
to be at least in part india should have likened them into human beings. so again, take homosexuality out of it. he's got this whole narrative about his mother's mental illness come a whole narrative about the woman who helps to put all these things manning builds. what he gives us is malcolm does not like women. maybe this is, maybe it's not, but the big issue is malcolm think someone can sit down and shut at. i.t. is becoming more of a gender democrat, but the part of that is one also has to have ethical and personal liking for women, that it can't be just an exclusively political. but to me, the sexual and erotic is standing in for the political and theological. i've got to say, i found -- i mean, i couldn't agree more about this issue of separating malcolm little from malcolm x dement themed attorney at malcolm x been one that's not just about race, but also about gender. i find precisely what you describe, melissa, as this place in which there is a kind of focus on men and the ideas of men to the exclusion to be like ho-hum in the sense that that is the space in which most powers exercised
to be sent overseas to customers and consumers and places like china, in places like india and brazil. when i say the things that we make, things that are made here in america. american economy, actually as we speak is slowly becoming more explore oriented, more manufacturing. look at some of these charts, you actually see an upturn taking place in the manufacturing sector, in the expert sector. the problem is that in the last ten or twenty years as the economy became so dependent on american consumers who are now reluctant to spend. those sectors got hollowed out really thinned out. the growth we are seeing in manufacturing, for instance, believe it or not. we are seeing upturns and we have a story in the paper today about car makers helping to drive the recovery. we are seeing upturns in the midwest in the great lakes states. they are just not big enough anymore to drive the overall economy. it used to be in the 1980s and 1970s, we would have the big inventory where they would cut back and rebuild and drive the economy out of recession and into an recovery. manufacturing isn't big enough to
.s., but there are native indigenous people that are being rise -- viz rated all over the world. india has some being hunted down more or less, and native indians in brazil, even in afghanistan, they call the areas where they are doing all the bombing, they are tribal areas, and i wondered if you could just speak to the fact that indigenous people all over the world are under attack, and is there some way that we can get this out into the press so understand that this should be stopped immediately. >> guest: well, what you're saying is true. i was just in norway, and i did a performance with asami person and a woman from india. she's a naga, that's the name of their indigenous nation under attack by the burmese, and i think what it is is there's always the land hunger, the need -- taking over for land, and the indoing nows people are -- indigenous people are vulnerable because they're in isolated areas or places they were sent that suddenly have resources available that others want. for instance, chevron has in, i think, it's costa rica has just covered the people, the land, the water, and the animals in oi
in this country. but i think there is opposition as well. i had a chance a few months ago to go to the india point nuclear power plant in new york with a lot of public interest. outside the gate of the plant were ten people who were protesting and were their partially because i was visiting so you have a press conference and on my way down i got out of the car, and what are finding general is there are lots of people with legitimate questions about the safety of nuclear power and ultimately it is the job of the nrc to make sure we take the appropriate steps to ensure the safety of the public. in the seven years i have been at the nrc, what i found is people who are dedicated every day to doing that, making sure we protect their health and safety is what we do. our have been impressed to see it so many ways as a commissioner. >> i will ask you to stand by. a couple of last housekeeping matters to take care of. i would like to remind our audience of the upcoming speakers. congresswoman michele bachman, presidential candidate of minnesota will be out here and the break goes on. governor gary johnson,
started their own three much previously. india, any calendar year 1944 when the germans produced 40,000 more points, the russians another 40,000, and britain produced 28,000, in that same year the united states produced no fewer than 98,000 warplanes, almost as much as the rest of the world put together. it's an unpaid bill country. it was obviously an act of lunatic hubris to have declared war against you, and it was done for ideological reasons. equally, the complete coordination with japan is an astonishing -- in hitler's strategic vision. had the japanese attacked from the east at the same time that he was attacking from the west in june 1941, there's a good chance that in october of that year the 16 siberian divisions would not have been able to have rolled across the euros to defend moscow at that key moment. only 16, 1941, stalin had his personal train made ready to take him back to katzenberg or even further back, just imagine the demoralization if that would have gotten out. if the germans got within 40 miles of the moscow subway system, it was incredibly close. up in the n
. india, japan. that's where we should be looking. host: next caller is bernie from new jersey. good morning. caller: good morning. your two guests are excellent. gives me a good perspective on everything. what scares me is there are no plans and no goals. the no goal part scares me as someone that has grown up with this space program at age 59. i think it is bad planning by this administration. i understand the professor saying we have to set our goals to what we are doing next. if we look at the government like your heart. we have arteries going out and veins coming in. if you are out sourcing, you are getting new technology in all the time. there's a lot that has made our life better through the space program. not just the goal of going to mars or whatever. thank you. very interesting discussion you are having. host: thank you. here is a question on facebook from paul. since the columbia accident, nasa has always had a second shuttle on the pad to perform a second rescue if needed, is it not in place for this launch? guest: it is not in place. this launch was intended to be a res
have a unique point of view that no one in this country has. even in hollywood india being the new black, i'm sorry, we have a unique perspective that no one else has because of our history. and we can write from that perspective. jewish people l have always had the outsider perspective, they have a unique perspective in their humor that they bring everywhere that's unique to their culture. but that's what we have here in america. no one else has our experience. so we can talk about it. we know the white culture better than they know the black culture. i mean, that's another story. there you go, i'm done. nig at night. >> that's a black thought. [laughter] >> jan? >> no, i mean, i would absolutely echo that, and i think, you know, just like it's very interesting how, you know, i look at a show like a "sex in the city," you know, every sister i know we would look at that show, and we would see ourselves in that show, and i know white women who can look at girlfriends and see themselves in that show. like larry was saying, we have these very common experiences, we have a unique persp
prime minister stand up for british business. and gets around world as i have done to china and india and africa and to suggest that because there are issues you have to answer a home you should cancel a trip like that and the opposition should be better than that. >> the select committees -- in 2003, on a catalog of the global traction in the media of potential payments made by journalists to the police. the investigation has announced will we understand the advice the committee would ignore? >> i am sure judicially inquiry will do that. one of the issues it is looking at is the relationship between politicians in the me and the conduct. >> if the prime minister had the new information about mr. coulson given by the guardian would he have gone ahead with the appointment? he should have passed that information. >> the point is this. if i have been told proper evidence that mr. coulson knew about hacking i would not have hired him. i couldn't be clear about this. .. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the previous -- or the prime minister's predecessor the honorable member said that he wanted t
serious to them and to us. as you know, they persist in the idea that the india poses an exsister-in-law threat to their existence while terrorists that operate in the fattah are less threat to them and therefore they allocate their resources accordingly and they embrace different engagement activities with us differently. we have been over the course of time working to convince them that the terrorist threat, the extremist threat and to their west is as great a threat and probably a greater threat to them than any threat that india might pose. but it's on that basis, it's on that select chal disagreement about what is most threatening to them that these programs are viewed. so we would tend to view programs to improve counterinsurgency capability and their general purpose forces, policing and security role for their frontier core. we would tend to view those as more important than the higher end processes and programs. it's just one of those things we have to continue to work through. >> thank you. there's been a great deal of discussion about standards of interrogation and detai
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